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Edoardo Campanella
Economist
UniCredit Bank, Milan
Piazza Gae Aulenti, 4 - Tower C - MRE4
I-20154 Milan
Italy
+39 02 8862-0522

Edoardo Campanella is an economist on the UniCredit Research team. His daily activity is mainly focused on macroeconomic developments taking place in the eurozone. He previously worked as an economist for the World Trade Organization, the World Economic Forum and the Italian Senate. He is a graduate of The Harvard Kennedy School, where he used to work as a teaching fellow for Larry Summers. In that capacity, he was selected as one of the best teachers of the year.

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712783191029ad9549795ab057e3836bd6cf9e2d81022da1291777c25bcae1eb;;[{"layout":"detailed","uid":26246,"publicationDate":"28 Sep 21","emaObject":{"protectedFileLink":"https:\/\/www.research.unicredit.eu\/DocsKey\/economics_docs_2021_181231.ashx?EXT=pdf&KEY=C814QI31EjqIm_1zIJDBJONVgIeo7x-ZU6taDmKjrKk=&T=1&T=1","protectedFileLinkDe":"","protectedFileLinkIt":""},"title":"Economics Chartbook - Central banks head for exit (4Q21)","titleDe":"","titleIt":"","product":"The Unicredit Economics Chartbook","synopsis":"<ul class=\"ucrBullets\"><li><strong> Global: <\/strong> Growth has peaked, and we are fine-tuning our global GDP growth forecast for this year, to 5.8% from 6%, and for next year, to 4.6% from 4.7%. The spread of the Delta variant has weighed on demand over the summer, while shortages of materials and labor continue to constrain supply and will probably last into 2022. Growth is likely to remain robust next year, thanks to accumulated household savings, inventory restocking, and the declining economic effects of each new wave of COVID-19. However, growth rates will naturally ease as pent-up demand, fiscal support and spare capacity fade. Inflation will likely remain high through year-end before moderating as base effects turn negative and supply starts to adjust. Central banks will continue to chart a gradual exit from emergency measures.<\/li><li><strong> US: <\/strong> We now expect GDP growth of 5.8% this year (from 6.1%) while our forecast for next year is 3.9% (from 3.8%). This is the result of a downward revision to growth in 3Q21 and slightly stronger growth early next year. GDP is likely to reach its pre-pandemic trend line in 1Q22, a quarter later than previously expected. Inflation is close to peaking but will likely remain elevated well into next year as supply disruption looks set to last longer than anticipated. We continue to see inflation falling back towards 2% by end-2022. The Fed will likely start tapering its QE in November and cease net purchases around mid-2022. We expect the first rate hike in early 2023, followed by a second hike in 2H23.<\/li><li><strong> Eurozone: <\/strong> GDP is likely to expand by 5% this year and by 4.3% in 2022. Activity is set to increase strongly again in 3Q21, followed by slower growth at the turn of the year as the reopening boost fades and manufacturing output slows. GDP will probably recover to its pre-pandemic level by year-end. Prospects for 2022 remain positive, supported by deployment of NGEU funds, but activity is unlikely to return to its pre-crisis trend before 2023. Inflation will probably peak in November at close to 4%, before falling sharply over the course of next year. The ECB seems keen to close the PEPP in March. If so, maintaining easy financing conditions and a smooth transmission of monetary policy would require stepping up the pace of the APP and increasing its flexibility.<\/li><li><strong> CEE: <\/strong> We expect economies in EU-CEE and in the Western Balkans to grow by around 6% in 2021 and 4.6% in 2022. Turkey\u00b4s economy could expand by 9.7% in 2021 and 5.5% in 2022. In Russia, GDP growth could slow from 4% in 2021 to 2.4% in 2022. In 2021, the recovery has been driven by pent-up consumer demand\u00a0and exports. In 2022, investment could contribute more to growth, helped in EU-CEE by NGEU disbursements, in Russia by spending from the National Wealth Fund and in Turkey by easier financial conditions. Supply-chain bottlenecks, rising energy prices and buoyant consumer demand could keep inflation outside target ranges for longer than central banks currently expect. Further monetary tightening is needed to ensure price stability.<\/li><li><strong> UK: <\/strong> We are lowering our GDP growth forecasts to 6.4% for this year (from 6.7%) and 5.9% next year (from 6.1%), delaying the time when we expect GDP to surpass its pre-pandemic level by one quarter to 2Q22. Inflation is set to rise to almost 4% in 4Q21 and remain there through 2Q22, before falling back to close to 2% by end-2022. The MPC seems prepared to raise rates as soon as February, but we expect lower growth and higher unemployment to delay a hike until late 2022\/early 2023.<\/li><li><strong> China: <\/strong> We are reducing our GDP growth forecast for 2021 to 8.2% from 8.5%, and for 2022 to 5.0% from 5.7%. The summer turned out to be challenging due to a mix of natural disasters and the spread of the Delta variant. Looking beyond 3Q21, there are several headwinds that might dent the economic outlook, from abrupt state interventionism to rising vulnerabilities in the real estate sector and an economically-damaging 'zero tolerance' approach to COVID-19. Fiscal and monetary policy are likely to remain accommodative. <\/li><\/ul>","synopsisDe":"","synopsisIt":"","hash":"712783191029ad9549795ab057e3836bd6cf9e2d81022da1291777c25bcae1eb","available":"0","settings":{"layout":"detailed","size":"default","showanalysts":"-1","showcompanies":"-1","showcountries":"-1","showcurrencies":"-1","nodate":"0","notitle":"0","noproduct":"0","noflags":"0","dateformat":"d M y","nolinktitle":"0","synopsislength":"400","synopsisexpand":"1","shownav":"0","limit":"1"}}]

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