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Dr. Ágnes Halász
Head of Economics and Strategic Analysis, Hungary
Chief Economist
UniCredit Hungary
Szabadság tér 5-6 -
HU-1054 Budapest
Hungary
+36 1 301-1907

Ágnes Halász joined UniCredit Bank Hungary as the head of Economics and Strategic Analysis in March 2016. Previously, she worked for the Ministry for National Economy in Hungary as deputy head of the Macroeconomic Policy department. She is already a familiar face within the UniCredit Group, having worked for the bank as a strategic analyst between 2011 and 2014. Ágnes graduated from the Corvinus University of Budapest in 2007 and has PhD in economics.

Latest contribution

1e41879c8ec555174e5c8cf556ee0accc3d36d0f9836f75e0437cdcda5a6795b;;[{"layout":"detailed","uid":26247,"publicationDate":"28 Sep 21","emaObject":{"protectedFileLink":"https:\/\/www.research.unicredit.eu\/DocsKey\/emergingmarkets_docs_2021_181230.ashx?EXT=pdf&KEY=l6KjPzSYBBGzROuioxedUNdVqq1wFeRoJRIvbGu4hUoKSAHz3HkdWA==&T=1&T=1","protectedFileLinkDe":"","protectedFileLinkIt":""},"title":"CEE Quarterly - Time for policy normalization (4Q21)","titleDe":"","titleIt":"","product":"CEE Quarterly","synopsis":"<ul class=\"ucrBullets\"><li> We expect economies in EU-CEE and in the Western Balkans, to grow by around 6% in 2021 and 4.6% in 2022. Turkey\u00b4s economy could grow by 9.7% in 2021 and 5.5% in 2022. In Russia, GDP growth could slow from 4% in 2021 to 2.4% in 2022. <\/li><li> Before the end of 2022, output gaps could turn positive in Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia and Turkey. <\/li><li> Pent-up demand is driving the recovery in 2021, helped by savings accumulated in 2020, and rising wages and employment. Exports are contributing to growth owing to strong demand for cars, a bumper harvest, returning foreign tourists and, in Turkey, to competitive gains amid currency depreciation. <\/li><li> In 2022, investment could contribute more to growth, helped in EU-CEE by disbursements from the EU\u00b4s Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF), in Russia by spending from National Wealth Fund and in Turkey by looser financial conditions.<\/li><li> Public policies are a risk to medium-term growth due to populist spending triggering a limited fiscal adjustment, a backlash against green energy, poor implementation of structural reforms and nationalist agendas affecting economic goals.<\/li><li> Supply-chain bottlenecks, rising energy prices and buoyant consumer demand could keep inflation outside target ranges for longer than central banks currently expect. Further monetary tightening is needed to ensure price stability.<\/li><li> Due to structurally tight labor-market conditions, we expect inflation in EU-CEE to diverge from that in the eurozone in the coming years, forcing EU-CEE central banks to tighten further. The CBR might need to keep the real interest rate positive due to structural rigidities. The CBRT gave up its inflation mandate, with potential consequences on financial stability.<\/li><\/ul>","synopsisDe":"","synopsisIt":"","hash":"1e41879c8ec555174e5c8cf556ee0accc3d36d0f9836f75e0437cdcda5a6795b","available":"0","settings":{"layout":"detailed","size":"default","showanalysts":"-1","showcompanies":"-1","showcountries":"-1","showcurrencies":"-1","nodate":"0","notitle":"0","noproduct":"0","noflags":"0","dateformat":"d M y","nolinktitle":"0","synopsislength":"400","synopsisexpand":"1","shownav":"0","limit":"1"}}]

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